teej: by <user name=collapsingnight> (rain)
Good points made in relation to yesterday's announcement that the police officer who attacked Ian Tomlinson (who died at the G20 protests last year) will not be facing criminal charges:
Madam Miaow: No police charged in Ian Tomlinson demo death
Liberal Conspiracy: A jury should decide the cause of Ian Tomlinson's death
(If you haven't seen it and can face it, video footage of the attack is on the Guardian website. Also, if you're in the UK, you may wish to sign the 38 degrees petition: Justice for Ian Tomlinson)

On the announcement that Yarl's Wood detention centre 'families wing' is to be closed:
Phil Shiner and Daniel Carey: Yarl's Wood itself is the moral outrage
(Medical Justice archives news coverage related to detention)

Plus, some good blog posts on bad media representations:
Muslimah Media Watch: What Not to Write: More on Bad Veil Headlines  (this is a follow-on from this post: Your Complete Guide to Bad Burqa Puns)
Mediahacker: How to write about Haiti

teej: by <user name=roxicons site=livejournal.com> (susan najarian)
so i noticed something that the politicians and the media are suddenly not talking about post-election while before they couldn't stop talking about it: immigration.

predictably the Conservatives/Liberal Democrats coalition agreements have resulted in the LibDems already sacrificing their pre-election commitment for an amnesty for (some) undocumented migrants. so that clearly wasn't a dealbreaker, or anywhere even near the top priorities for them.

on the absolute about-fucking-time upside the coalition statement does say "We will end the detention of children for immigration purposes" and it is a credit to all the anti-detention campaigners who have been working for this. and now we must hold them to it.

but this is not enough. politicians and the media stirred up and played into anti-immigrant racism in their election campaigns. now they've gone all quiet on the issue. but racism and xenophobia has not  magically gone away.

any hope (if there ever was any) that the government will be involved in challenging anti-immigrant racism has been quashed. back to business as usual it seems. LIbDems have been told to pipe down about the amnesty, and any talk which doesn't centre the need to 'secure borders' or 'implement limits' has been firmly re-established as beyond the pale.

in this climate the campaign to end child detention can be successful (and it must) only because it doesn't actually challenge any of the racist logic which underpins immigration restrictions. instead it reinforces divisions between 'good' and 'bad'  immigrants, deserving and undeserving, innocent victims vs 'illegal' criminals.

and thousands of children, while they may not be detained, will of course still be deported and labelled 'illegal' at the same rate as before. 
teej: (Default)
 
"A Nigerian man on hunger strike has died on the tarmac at Zurich airport after Swiss authorities tried to deport him using a special flight to deport asylum seekers ...

Police said they had shackled the man because he had resisted deportation. Two Nigerian witnesses quoted by the Swissinfo news website accused the police of inhumane treatment....

"They shackled our feet, knees, hands, hips, arms and torso and made us wear a helmet like those worn by boxers. It was simply impossible to move," he said...." [link to whole article]
 


 
teej: (Default)
I don't know how many times I have quoted this but it remains as relevant as ever.

“In attempting to shift the ground of feminist discourse, the adversary has at times appeared to be white feminists but is in fact, I would venture, white feminism – by which I expressly do not mean any feminism espoused by white feminists. I refer, rather, to any feminism which comes from a white perspective, and universalizes it.

I do not propose that white feminism is a clearly defined, coherent and internally consistent body of thought that feeds off conscious racist intentions. It is, rather, a way of seeing which, however inadvertent, leaves identifiable traces. It subsists through a failure to consider both the wider social and political context of power in which feminist utterances and actions take place, and the ability of feminism to influence that context.”

- Razia Aziz, "Feminism and the challenge of racism: Deviance or difference?", in Black British Feminism: A Reader (ed. by Heidi Safia Mirza, 1997)


teej: (Default)
White feminists and queers, listen:

“Infantilization of judgment is a dulling of the ability to read critically, and with maturity of judgment, those texts and situations in which race and ethnicity are salient. It appears to me as a flight into a state in which one cannot be critical or responsible: a flight into those characteristics of childhood that excuse ignorance and confusion, and that appeal to authority. If the description “child” is an appropriate description of white/Anglas in the context of racism and ethnocentrism, then to ascribe responsibility to them for the understanding and undoing of these phenomena is inappropriate. If a child, the white/Angla can be guilty of racism and ethnocentrism innocently, unmarked and untouched in her goodness, confused with good reason, a passive learner because she cannot exercise her judgment with maturity. But, of course, she is not a child. She is an ethnocentric racist.

Infantilization of judgment is a form of ethnocentric racism precisely because it is a self-indulgent denial of one’s understanding of one’s culture and its expressing racism... In infantilization of judgment, the racist attempts to hide that she understands racism as a participant.”
 
 
- María Lugones, "Hablanda Cara a Cara/Speaking Face to Face: An Exploration of Ethnocentric Racism" in Pilgrimages / Peregrinajes: Theorizing  Coalition Against Multiple Oppressions (2003)
teej: (Default)
I'm working on something longer in response to this racist crap but I don't have the brain energy to finish it right now... But if you haven't heard about it yet, short version is Peter Tatchell has responded to an article in which his imperialist queer politics are critiqued with a racist, defensive and undermining attack on the authors, which has basically forced the book which the chapter appears in out of print. Grassroots Feminism has a roundup of links which is a good place to start.

The chapter is "Gay Imperialism: Gender and Sexuality Discourse in the 'War on Terror", by Jin Haritaworn, Tamsila Tauqir and Esra Erdem, and it's in the book Out of Place: Interrogating Silences in Queerness/Raciality (ed. Adi Kuntsman & Esperanza Miyake, 1998).

August 2010

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